Esther Duflo

Esther Duflo
Esther Duflo - Pop!Tech 2009 - 001 (cropped).jpg
Duflo in 2009
Born (1972-10-25) 25 October 1972 (age 49)
Nationality[1]
EducationÉcole normale supérieure, Paris (BA)
School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (DEA)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (PhD)
Spouse(s)
(m. 2015)
Children2
AwardsNobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2019)
Princess of Asturias Awards (Social Sciences, 2015)
Infosys Prize (2014)
John von Neumann Award (2013)
Dan David Prize (2013)
John Bates Clark Medal (2010)
Calvó-Armengol International Prize (2010)
MacArthur Fellowship (2009)
Scientific career
FieldsSocial economics
Development economics
InstitutionsMassachusetts Institute of Technology
Doctoral advisorAbhijit Banerjee[2]
Joshua Angrist[2]
Doctoral studentsDean Karlan[3]
Rema Hanna[4]
Nancy Qian[5]
Rachael Meager[6]

Esther Duflo, FBA (French: [dyflo]; born 25 October 1972) is a FrenchAmerican economist[7] who is a professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She is the co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL),[8] which was established in 2003.[9] She shared the 2019 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with Abhijit Banerjee[10] and Michael Kremer,[11] "for their experimental approach to alleviating global poverty".[12]

Duflo is a National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)[13] research associate, a board member of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD),[14] and director of the Centre for Economic Policy Research's development economics program. Her research focuses on microeconomic issues in developing countries, including household behavior, education, access to finance, health, and policy evaluation. Together with Abhijit Banerjee,[10] Dean Karlan,[15] Michael Kremer,[11] John A. List,[16] and Sendhil Mullainathan,[17] she has been a driving force in advancing field experiments as an important methodology to discover causal relationships in economics. Together with Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics[18] and Good Economics for Hard Times,[19] published in April 2011 and November 2019, respectively. According to the Open Syllabus Project, Duflo is the seventh most frequently cited author on college syllabi for economics courses.[20]

  1. ^ "Esther Duflo CV".
  2. ^ a b Duflo, Esther (1999), Essays in empirical development economics. PhD dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  3. ^ Karlan, Dean S. (2002), Social capital and microfinance. PhD dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  4. ^ Hanna, Rema (2005), Essays in development and environmental economics. PhD dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  5. ^ Qian, Nancy (2005), Three essays on development economics in China. PhD dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  6. ^ Meager, Rachael (2017) Evidence aggregation in development economics via Bayesian hierarchical models. PhD dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  7. ^ "Esther Duflo Short Bio and CV".
  8. ^ https://www.povertyactionlab.org Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  9. ^ Biswas, Soutik (15 October 2019). "The Nobel couple fighting poverty cliches". BBC. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  10. ^ a b https://economics.mit.edu/faculty/banerjee/short Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  11. ^ a b https://scholar.harvard.edu/kremer/home Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  12. ^ Cite error: The named reference NobelWeb was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  13. ^ https://www.nber.org Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  14. ^ http://ibread.org/bread/ Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  15. ^ http://deankarlan.com Retrieved July 25, 2020, Saturday
  16. ^ "John List – Home Page". voices.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  17. ^ https://www.chicagobooth.edu/faculty/directory/m/sendhil-mullainathan Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  18. ^ https://economics.mit.edu/faculty/eduflo/pooreconomics Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  19. ^ http://news.mit.edu/2019/good-economics-hard-times-1112 Retrieved July 24, 2020, Friday
  20. ^ "Open Syllabus Project".